According to Christine Sullivan, founder of Real Help for Chronic Pain, an online pain management program, “Chronic pain is almost never merely a physical thing. We can see from brain mapping that chronic pain uses very different nerve paths from acute pain. In fact, the brain maps of chronic pain look just like the brain maps of intense emotions like anger, or sadness, or fear.”
The old “bring people to the table” metaphor rang especially egregious to the artist and writer Anasa Troutman, who had a similarly revelatory vision for wellness: “Unless we’re willing to make a commitment to community, we will never be well. Even if you wake up every morning and drink your juice and do your yoga, without that commitment to each other we will not be well as a country and as a world,” Troutman said.
Keep your blood pressure under control. People with diabetes are more likely to have high blood pressure than are people who don't have diabetes. Having both high blood pressure and diabetes greatly increases your risk of complications because both damage your blood vessels and reduce blood flow. Try to keep your blood pressure in the range your doctor recommends, and be sure to have it checked at every office visit.
Poxel (PP:POXEL) is a French pharmaceutical company that recently received $30.1 million in post-IPO equity in 2016. The company has developed an orally active medication called Imeglimin, which targets all three organs and body systems that are affected by diabetes simultaneously: the pancreas, liver, and muscles. The drug is currently undergoing phase 3 clinical work in Japan, and will commence phase 3 trials in the European Union and the United States that will be completed by 2019. The company is also concurrently working on several other pharmaceutical agents in various stages of the development pipeline.
Anything that makes nerves more sensitive can increase pain. Feelings of stress, fear, helplessness, or anger can increase pain sensitivity. Trauma — such as a physical injury or psychological or sexual abuse — often leads to chronic pain later on. In a study of people with traumatic injuries conducted by researchers at the University of Washington in Seattle, nearly 63% had severe pain one year later. It may be that trauma causes nerves to become oversensitive as a way of trying to prevent further injury. This may be why military veterans have the highest rates of chronic pain.
People with glucose levels between normal and diabetic have impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) or insulin resistance. People with impaired glucose tolerance do not have diabetes, but are at high risk for progressing to diabetes. Each year, 1% to 5% of people whose test results show impaired glucose tolerance actually eventually develop diabetes. Weight loss and exercise may help people with impaired glucose tolerance return their glucose levels to normal. In addition, some physicians advocate the use of medications, such as metformin (Glucophage), to help prevent/delay the onset of overt diabetes.
Physical treatments for chronic pain can include applying heat or cold to the part that hurts, massage, exercise, and rest. Sensations of heat, cold, and touch travel on the same nerves as pain sensations, but they travel faster. A sensation of gentle touch, heat, or cold will therefore beat a pain signal to the next pain gate and block the pain from getting through. Certain substances including capsaicin (chili pepper extract) provide a sensation of heat when rubbed on the skin that may keep a pain gate blocked for hours.
According to Christine Sullivan, founder of Real Help for Chronic Pain, an online pain management program, “Chronic pain is almost never merely a physical thing. We can see from brain mapping that chronic pain uses very different nerve paths from acute pain. In fact, the brain maps of chronic pain look just like the brain maps of intense emotions like anger, or sadness, or fear.”

Access the ADA’s health and wellness programs as part of your ADA student membership. Each state association has a health and wellness director who can help you with anything from stress, mental well-being and addiction. You can contact your state association directly or call ADA Manager of Dentist Health and Wellness Alison Bramhall at 312-440-2622.


Urinary tract problems. Some medications can interfere with bladder function. Your doctor may recommend stopping or changing medications. A strict urination schedule or urinating every few hours (timed urination) while applying gentle pressure to the bladder area (below your bellybutton) is recommended. Other methods, including self-catheterization, may be needed to remove urine from a nerve-damaged bladder.
For 15 years, Erez Benari’s struggle with his type 2 diabetes had been a losing one. A software engineer at Microsoft in Seattle, Washington, Benari had stuck to a restrictive diet that kept him off most carbs, along with regular insulin shots. But still, his high blood sugar levels never dropped, while his health continued to decline. In 2013, the then 39-year-old Benari suffered a heart attack.
"There have been cases where patients were treated with insulin for years until they discovered it was a rare genetic variant" of MODY, Roep told Live Science. Those people are no longer diagnosed as having type 1 diabetes, and they may be able to manage their blood sugar levels with either oral drugs or diet and exercise changes, "but that would not be the same as being cured," Roep said.  
With a smaller food supply and a large influx of worthless and acidic mycotoxins, the organs become weak. When the organs become weak the immune system also becomes weak. And that is the missing link to why the immune system is weak. It is microbes and parasites in the organs which are starting the chain reaction of events that cause type 2 diabetes. The immune system may be attacking its own cells because the immune system has been weakened by microbes and parasites in the organs or the damage may be done by microbes and parasites attacking the organs directly.
You should have no more than three of these “feeding times” per day. The reason limiting the number and duration of your meal times is so important has to do with staying out of the vicious cycle of increasing insulin resistance. To get smart on insulin resistance — the cause of both type 2 diabetes and obesity — read Dr. Jason Fung’s book, The Obesity Code: Unlocking the Secrets of Weight Loss, or watch his free lecture on YouTube.
Though the Oxford English Dictionary traces wellness (meaning the opposite of illness) to the 1650s, the story of the wellness movement really begins in the 1950s. New approaches to healthful living were emerging then, inspired in part by the preamble to the World Health Organization’s 1948 constitution: “Health is a state of complete physical, mental and social well-being and not merely the absence of disease or infirmity.” Halbert L. Dunn, chief of the National Office of Vital Statistics, was looking for new terminology to convey the positive aspects of health that people could achieve, beyond simply avoiding sickness. In a series of papers and lectures in the late ’50s, Dunn sketched out his concept of “high-level wellness,” defined as “an integrated method of functioning, which is oriented toward maximizing the potential of which the individual is capable.”
Chronic pain can reflect injury that hasn’t completely healed. More often, it is caused by nerves that have become oversensitive or by a brain that is misreading the signals it receives. If acute pain goes on too long, nerves and brain can tire of the constant signals and just decide the injury is permanent. That’s why it’s important to treat acute pain seriously. For example, if you injure your foot or your back and don’t treat it promptly — with adequate rest, other first-aid measures, and seeing a doctor if the pain is severe or persists — mild pain can become severe, and acute pain can become chronic.
In type I diabetes, insufficient levels of insulin result from the immune system itself attacking the pancreatic beta cells. On the other hand, while beta cell dysfunction varies widely between type II diabetes patients, insulin resistance is a major part of the disease. Restoring the beta cells of the pancreas to health is the treatment approach these two diseases share to some degree.
The mission of Student Health and Counseling Services is to enhance the physical and mental health of students in order to help them achieve academic success, personal development and lifelong wellness by providing an integrated program of quality, accessible, cost sensitive and confidential healthcare services, tailored to their unique and diverse needs and to assist the University community, through consultation and education, to develop a healthy campus environment consistent with UC Davis "Principles of Community".
Beware of claims that seem too good to be true. Look for scientific-based sources of information. The National Diabetes Information Clearinghouse collects resource information for the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK) Reference Collection, a service of the National Institutes of Health. To learn more about alternative therapies for diabetes treatment, contact the National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine Clearinghouse.
Innovation in technology is not just fuelling advances in diabetes treatments though. I know it will accelerate the path to the cure. And this is what unites people with type-1 diabetes, researchers, our charitable supporters and funders. I am convinced one day we will consign type 1 to the history books and no one will ever receive this life-changing diagnosis again.
^ O'Gara PT, Kushner FG, Ascheim DD, Casey DE, Chung MK, de Lemos JA, Ettinger SM, Fang JC, Fesmire FM, Franklin BA, Granger CB, Krumholz HM, Linderbaum JA, Morrow DA, Newby LK, Ornato JP, Ou N, Radford MJ, Tamis-Holland JE, Tommaso CL, Tracy CM, Woo YJ, Zhao DX, Anderson JL, Jacobs AK, Halperin JL, Albert NM, Brindis RG, Creager MA, DeMets D, Guyton RA, Hochman JS, Kovacs RJ, Kushner FG, Ohman EM, Stevenson WG, Yancy CW (January 2013). "2013 ACCF/AHA guideline for the management of ST-elevation myocardial infarction: a report of the American College of Cardiology Foundation/American Heart Association Task Force on Practice Guidelines". Circulation. 127 (4): e362–425. doi:10.1161/CIR.0b013e3182742cf6. PMID 23247304.
This content is provided as a service of the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK), part of the National Institutes of Health. The NIDDK translates and disseminates research findings through its clearinghouses and education programs to increase knowledge and understanding about health and disease among patients, health professionals, and the public. Content produced by the NIDDK is carefully reviewed by NIDDK scientists and other experts.
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