Hypoglycemia means abnormally low blood sugar (glucose). In patients with diabetes, the most common cause of low blood sugar is excessive use of insulin or other glucose-lowering medications, to lower the blood sugar level in diabetic patients in the presence of a delayed or absent meal. When low blood sugar levels occur because of too much insulin, it is called an insulin reaction. Sometimes, low blood sugar can be the result of an insufficient caloric intake or sudden excessive physical exertion.
In the US, 84.1 million adults—more than 1 in 3—have prediabetes, and 90% of them don’t know they have it. Prediabetes is a serious health condition where blood sugar levels are higher than normal, but not high enough yet to be diagnosed as diabetes. Prediabetes increases your risk for type 2 diabetes, heart disease, and stroke. But through the CDC-led National Diabetes Prevention Program, you can learn practical, real-life changes that can cut your risk for developing type 2 diabetes by as much as 58% (71% if you’re 60 or older).
Instead of referring patients to outside specialists, internists and general practitioners can continue to helm their patients’ diabetic care through Diabetes Relief with referrals to a nearby center. The patient’s doctor and the team at Diabetes Relief work together to get the patient on the road to recovery—not just to a plateau of keeping symptoms in check. Or, doctors can expand their scope of practice and own an in-house, turnkey Diabetes Healthcare Center. This helps their patients avoid the suffering and expense of dialysis or amputations through the proven therapies of Diabetes Relief.

Diabetes Relief’s treatment program actually reconditions your metabolism. Consider this: Diabetes is not the root cause of your condition but a label used to categorize your comorbidities. Diabetes stems from a metabolic disorder and, through infusion therapy and natural supplements custom designed as part of the care plan, a patient’s metabolism gets a much-needed boost between treatments. Not only are patients reporting a decreased dependency on insulin, but wounds are healing, neuropathy is dissipating, and vision is returning!
Many herbal remedies have been used to reduce inflammation and pain. Writing in the online publication U.S. Pharmacist, Antoine Al-Achi, PhD, a Professor of Pharmaceutics at the Campbell University School of Pharmacy in North Carolina, reported that bromelain (pineapple enzyme), curcumin (an antioxidant found in turmeric), echinacea, chamomile, ginger, and arnica have shown anti-inflammatory effects. Preparations of these plant-based supplements are widely available at health-food stores. If you would like to try one or more of these supplements, speak to your doctor first about possible side effects and drug interactions.
There are eight dimensions of wellness: occupational, emotional, spiritual, environmental, financial, physical, social, and intellectual. Each dimension of wellness is interrelated with another. Each dimension is equally vital in the pursuit of optimum health. One can reach an optimal level of wellness by understanding how to maintain and optimize each of the dimensions of wellness.
Metformin is generally recommended as a first line treatment for type 2 diabetes, as there is good evidence that it decreases mortality.[6] It works by decreasing the liver's production of glucose.[87] Several other groups of drugs, mostly given by mouth, may also decrease blood sugar in type II DM. These include agents that increase insulin release, agents that decrease absorption of sugar from the intestines, and agents that make the body more sensitive to insulin.[87] When insulin is used in type 2 diabetes, a long-acting formulation is usually added initially, while continuing oral medications.[6] Doses of insulin are then increased to effect.[6][88]
According to Christine Sullivan, founder of Real Help for Chronic Pain, an online pain management program, “Chronic pain is almost never merely a physical thing. We can see from brain mapping that chronic pain uses very different nerve paths from acute pain. In fact, the brain maps of chronic pain look just like the brain maps of intense emotions like anger, or sadness, or fear.”
Type 1 diabetes is caused by an autoimmune reaction (the body attacks itself by mistake) that stops your body from making insulin. About 5% of the people who have diabetes have type 1. Symptoms of type 1 diabetes often develop quickly. It’s usually diagnosed in children, teens, and young adults. If you have type 1 diabetes, you’ll need to take insulin every day to survive. Currently, no one knows how to prevent type 1 diabetes.
Anything that makes nerves more sensitive can increase pain. Feelings of stress, fear, helplessness, or anger can increase pain sensitivity. Trauma — such as a physical injury or psychological or sexual abuse — often leads to chronic pain later on. In a study of people with traumatic injuries conducted by researchers at the University of Washington in Seattle, nearly 63% had severe pain one year later. It may be that trauma causes nerves to become oversensitive as a way of trying to prevent further injury. This may be why military veterans have the highest rates of chronic pain.
Since chronic pain has so many contributing causes — physical, mental, and emotional — there are many ways to break into the pain cycle, reduce pain levels, and gain comfort. There may not be a cure for chronic pain, but a person can gain some control over his pain. Feeling more in control, even a little bit, can help people relax, try new things, and gain even more control. In this way, even severe chronic pain can be managed, and the person with pain can gain better health in the process.
Diabetes: The differences between types 1 and 2 There are fundamental differences between diabetes type 1 and type 2, including when they might occur, their causes, and how they affect someone's life. Find out here what distinguishes the different forms of the disease, the various symptoms, treatment methods, and how blood tests are interpreted. Read now
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