As a global network of medical research charities, the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation (JDRF) is driving research into new treatments that present tremendous opportunities to deliver enhanced health and wellbeing for people with type-1 diabetes. The technology I am currently most enthused about is glucose responsive insulin, which I think is going to transform how people treat and live with type 1 in the future.


When pain is a source of fear, anger, or grief, it usually hurts more. Cancer patients may experience worse pain, because they fear it means their disease is worsening or that they may be dying. Because your thoughts about your pain have a major effect on how bad it feels, it can help to change your thoughts. For example, you might try changing a negative thought such as, “This pain keeps me from doing everything I like,” to a more realistic, positive one such as, “This pain makes it harder to do things, but I can sometimes find different ways to do them.” Doing this can actually turn down your pain level.

Diabetes can also result from other hormonal disturbances, such as excessive growth hormone production (acromegaly) and Cushing's syndrome. In acromegaly, a pituitary gland tumor at the base of the brain causes excessive production of growth hormone, leading to hyperglycemia. In Cushing's syndrome, the adrenal glands produce an excess of cortisol, which promotes blood sugar elevation.
The above two rules are the only dietary rules you need to maintain ideal weight for the rest of your life, assuming you apply common sense and avoid extremes. The diet works by building in regular periods of insulin relief, keeping your body from becoming resistant to insulin. Following these two rules, you will maintain your weight and health by never entering the vicious cycle of increasing insulin resistance.
Check out the NWI Podcast to hear from wellness experts in all Six Dimensions of Wellness. Hear from wellness coaches, worksite wellness experts, psychologists, medical doctors, spiritual teachers, and more with evidence-based information and practical tips on how to improve your holistic wellness today. Go to NWIpodcast.org  to listen and download show notes and bonus materials (NWI members get access to exclusive bonus materials). You can also listen on Soundcloud or subscribe on iTunes.
As of 2016, 422 million people have diabetes worldwide,[101] up from an estimated 382 million people in 2013[17] and from 108 million in 1980.[101] Accounting for the shifting age structure of the global population, the prevalence of diabetes is 8.5% among adults, nearly double the rate of 4.7% in 1980.[101] Type 2 makes up about 90% of the cases.[16][18] Some data indicate rates are roughly equal in women and men,[18] but male excess in diabetes has been found in many populations with higher type 2 incidence, possibly due to sex-related differences in insulin sensitivity, consequences of obesity and regional body fat deposition, and other contributing factors such as high blood pressure, tobacco smoking, and alcohol intake.[102][103]
People with diabetes can benefit from education about the disease and treatment, good nutrition to achieve a normal body weight, and exercise, with the goal of keeping both short-term and long-term blood glucose levels within acceptable bounds. In addition, given the associated higher risks of cardiovascular disease, lifestyle modifications are recommended to control blood pressure.[80][81]
The problem, according to gastroenterologist Hiroshi Mashimo, MD, PhD, is that 70 percent of PPI users take the medications incorrectly. “They aren’t getting proper instruction,” says Mashimo. “Most people equate PPIs as a stronger form of an antacid.” Antacids neutralize acid and are meant to be taken to quell symptoms as they occur. PPIs are part of a more long-term strategy. The right way to take them is in the morning, just before or with breakfast. Food “turns on” the body’s acid-making cells; the medication can then work to stop stomach acid production.
Everyone strays; everyone tries to avoid pain instead of learning from it; everyone has ways of escaping anxiety that aren’t productive. At its best, wellness offers habits and practices around which to build a community that will help you feel whole, or at least distract from the sense of inadequacy that drives people to self-injurious behavior—whether it be substance abuse or gambling or mistreating others or spending three hours a day on Instagram despite knowing it makes us feel bad.
If the amount of insulin available is insufficient, or if cells respond poorly to the effects of insulin (insulin insensitivity or insulin resistance), or if the insulin itself is defective, then glucose will not be absorbed properly by the body cells that require it, and it will not be stored appropriately in the liver and muscles. The net effect is persistently high levels of blood glucose, poor protein synthesis, and other metabolic derangements, such as acidosis.[60]
Research shows that cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) combined with medication works best. CBT works by identifying, understanding, and changing thoughts and behaviors, according to the Anxiety and Depression Association of America. As an active participant in your treatment, in CBT you'll do homework and practice exercises over several weeks or months. “This is a new skill that you’re having to fine-tune and develop over time in order to incorporate it into your day-to-day life,” Bereolos says.
^ Ahlqvist, Emma; Storm, Petter; Käräjämäki, Annemari; Martinell, Mats; Dorkhan, Mozhgan; Carlsson, Annelie; Vikman, Petter; Prasad, Rashmi B; Aly, Dina Mansour (2018). "Novel subgroups of adult-onset diabetes and their association with outcomes: a data-driven cluster analysis of six variables". The Lancet Diabetes & Endocrinology. 0 (5): 361–369. doi:10.1016/S2213-8587(18)30051-2. ISSN 2213-8587. PMID 29503172.
"What is interesting is that some patients retain beta cell function for over 50 years," he said. "And, it seems if you retain some, that's a lot better." So, for Darkes to still have some functioning beta cells would not be impossible, but it wouldn't eliminate the disease, Von Herrath said. "Depending on how many beta cells he has, maybe his form of type 1 diabetes was not very severe."

The classic oral glucose tolerance test measures blood glucose levels five times over a period of three hours. Some physicians simply get a baseline blood sample followed by a sample two hours after drinking the glucose solution. In a person without diabetes, the glucose levels rise and then fall quickly. In someone with diabetes, glucose levels rise higher than normal and fail to come back down as fast.
India is said to be the diabetes capital of the world. With nearly 50 million people in India suffering from diabetes, the country has a big challenge to face. First, let’s know what is diabetes. The elevated sugar in the blood is called diabetes. There are two primary reasons behind diabetes - one is when our body stops producing insulin and second is when the body does not respond to insulin that is produced by the body. Insulin is broken down by the body and used as energy, which is transported to the cells. There are two types of diabetes - Type I diabetes and Type II diabetes. Let’s know about them in a little detail:

Type 2 diabetes was also previously referred to as non-insulin dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM), or adult-onset diabetes mellitus (AODM). In type 2 diabetes, patients can still produce insulin, but do so relatively inadequately for their body's needs, particularly in the face of insulin resistance as discussed above. In many cases this actually means the pancreas produces larger than normal quantities of insulin. A major feature of type 2 diabetes is a lack of sensitivity to insulin by the cells of the body (particularly fat and muscle cells).

People tend to push themselves until pain or fatigue makes them stop. They then rest for the shortest possible time, then get back to work until pain stops them again. You can prevent this cycle by pacing yourself: Figure out how much you can do without pain, and stop before you reach that point. Rest up, then start again. You’ll get more done with less pain.


Head over to Leaping Bunny's website to search an extensive list of other beauty, health, and wellness brands that are also certified. — Jenna Rosenstein, Harper's BAZAAR, "Covergirl is Now Cruelty-Free Certified by Leaping Bunny," 6 Nov. 2018 Your Health Learn this ancient martial art and focus on wellness in your body, mind and soul. — Mary Lou Cruz, Sun-Sentinel.com, "Fort Lauderdale area events July 18-28," 13 July 2018 Balance a budget, save money Fort Bend County Libraries’ Cinco Ranch Branch Library, 2620 Commercial Center Blvd. in Katy, will present a special free program on financial wellness from 10:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m. Saturday, June 30. — Houston Chronicle, "Katy-area calendar of events," 18 June 2018 The technology explosion of wellness and sleep is really staggering. — Laura Regensdorf, Vogue, "How to Get a Better Night’s Sleep—And Why It Should Be Your Top Priority (Really)," 1 Nov. 2018 Weight Watchers wanted to distance itself from diet culture and align itself with wellness and body positivity. — Eliza Brooke, Vox, "It costs a lot for a huge company like Dunkin’ Donuts to change its name. So what’s the payoff?," 25 Oct. 2018 So naturally, lighting was one of the most important elements of our Whole Home Project, which celebrates living with wellness and technology. — Madeleine Bokan, House Beautiful, "This House Has The Coolest Lighting You’ve Ever Seen," 19 Oct. 2018 Owner Rachel Krupa grew up in rural Michigan, where the local market was a place for community building, but eventually moved to Los Angeles to launch a career doing public relations for brands that focus on wellness and sustainability. — Brittany Martin, Los Angeles Magazine, "Silver Lake Just Got the Bodega of Its Dreams," 18 Apr. 2018 Enjoy a wellness and resource fair, family fun and prizes. — Jennifer Jhon, South Florida Parenting, "Top family fun for weekend includes surf and Earth fests, puppets, ice shows," 4 Apr. 2018

Type 2 diabetes was also previously referred to as non-insulin dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM), or adult-onset diabetes mellitus (AODM). In type 2 diabetes, patients can still produce insulin, but do so relatively inadequately for their body's needs, particularly in the face of insulin resistance as discussed above. In many cases this actually means the pancreas produces larger than normal quantities of insulin. A major feature of type 2 diabetes is a lack of sensitivity to insulin by the cells of the body (particularly fat and muscle cells).
But carping over wellness faded away in the ’90s as the term gained a foothold in everyday use. The American Heritage Dictionary silently dropped the usage note on wellness in its fourth edition in 2000, a decision that its supervising editor, Steve Kleinedler, chalks up to the growing prevalence of wellness programs in the workplace and beyond. A word that once sounded strange and unnecessary, even to its original boosters, has become tacitly accepted as part of our lexicon of health. Well, well, well.

“A significant cost is the association of wellness with money—thinking you need something external, tinctures and potions and balms. Its, you know, it’s the stuff that’s here,” said the Zen priest Angel Kyodo Williams, the second of only four black women recognized as teachers in the Japanese Zen lineage, during a talk in the latter wing as she gestured in the direction of the expo. “And there’s nothing wrong with those things, but we have a psychic connection that wellness equals something I can purchase, something I’m in competition for, something that I have to acquire because it’s not intrinsic to me.”


When 69-year-old Sandi, of Houston, was diagnosed with type 2 diabetes in 2007, she was confident she’d be able to manage the disease well. “I felt like, ‘I have this handled, it will be great,’” she recalls. Yet after the death of her best friend, five years ago, she started to experience anxiety and depression, and, she says, “it started manifesting more with my diabetes.”


Chronically high blood glucose levels are known to damage nerves, so keeping blood glucose levels close to the normal, nondiabetic range can greatly reduce neuropathic pain. (Sometimes, however, if nerve damage has caused numbness in the feet, legs, hands, or arms, improving blood glucose control can cause pain in these areas as the nerves start to heal and regain function. The pain is usually temporary.)

“I don’t do anything a little bit,” said Nadia Bolz-Weber, a speaker whose recovery from addiction led her to become an ultraprogressive Lutheran minister. “I think that whole ‘balance’ thing is just another thing society made up to make me feel bad about myself. I’m not going to be someone who’s not intense, that’s not going to happen. So I was intense about the way I drank and did drugs.”
^ Sattar N, Preiss D, Murray HM, Welsh P, Buckley BM, de Craen AJ, Seshasai SR, McMurray JJ, Freeman DJ, Jukema JW, Macfarlane PW, Packard CJ, Stott DJ, Westendorp RG, Shepherd J, Davis BR, Pressel SL, Marchioli R, Marfisi RM, Maggioni AP, Tavazzi L, Tognoni G, Kjekshus J, Pedersen TR, Cook TJ, Gotto AM, Clearfield MB, Downs JR, Nakamura H, Ohashi Y, Mizuno K, Ray KK, Ford I (February 2010). "Statins and risk of incident diabetes: a collaborative meta-analysis of randomised statin trials". Lancet. 375 (9716): 735–42. doi:10.1016/S0140-6736(09)61965-6. PMID 20167359.

Access the ADA’s health and wellness programs as part of your ADA student membership. Each state association has a health and wellness director who can help you with anything from stress, mental well-being and addiction. You can contact your state association directly or call ADA Manager of Dentist Health and Wellness Alison Bramhall at 312-440-2622.
Electrical stimulation can sometimes block pain signals from traveling up the nerves. The most commonly used system is called TENS, which stands for transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation. TENS works by sending electrical pulses across the surface of the skin into the nerves. The stimulating pulses help prevent pain signals from reaching the brain. They also help stimulate your body to produce higher levels of its own natural painkillers, called endorphins.

An unbalanced microbiome composition, known as dysbiosis, has been found in patients with diabetes, for whom the diversity of the gut microbiome is often reduced as compared to healthy people. Researchers from the University of Amsterdam recently showed that fecal transplants, used to transfer the microbiome of a healthy person to the gut of one with diabetes, can result in a short-term improvement of the insulin resistance found in obese patients with type 2 diabetes.
The National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine, part of the National Institutes of Health, defines complementary and alternative medicine as a "group of diverse medical and health care systems, practices, and products that are not presently considered to be part of conventional medicine." Complementary medicine is used with conventional treatments, whereas alternative medicine is used instead of conventional medicine.
The consumption of commodified connection doesn’t need to require a small fortune, though. In fact, it can’t, by any of the new, woke definitions of wellness. Hoess would like to get Wellspring up to 4,000 people or so, he tells me, in order to keep the price down. I met two seekers who were there on scholarship, and four who had won a ticket through an Instagram giveaway (people actually do win those things). Hoess contrasted his model with smaller events like the Aspen Ideas Festival (which The Atlantic has long been a partner in producing), which tend to be more expensive at least partly due to scale.
Encellin’s ultra thin-film device won a $10,000 research prize in The American Diabetes Association's 22nd Annual Leaders Forum HealthTech Showcase in Northern California in late 2017. The company also won a 2016 Innovation Award from the San Francisco-based Rosenman  Institute, an organization that aims to support the development of innovative medical-device technologies.

The word diabetes (/ˌdaɪ.əˈbiːtiːz/ or /ˌdaɪ.əˈbiːtɪs/) comes from Latin diabētēs, which in turn comes from Ancient Greek διαβήτης (diabētēs), which literally means "a passer through; a siphon".[111] Ancient Greek physician Aretaeus of Cappadocia (fl. 1st century CE) used that word, with the intended meaning "excessive discharge of urine", as the name for the disease.[112][113] Ultimately, the word comes from Greek διαβαίνειν (diabainein), meaning "to pass through,"[111] which is composed of δια- (dia-), meaning "through" and βαίνειν (bainein), meaning "to go".[112] The word "diabetes" is first recorded in English, in the form diabete, in a medical text written around 1425.

Ariana Shakibinia decided to study public health in large part because she lives with T1D. She had always been interested in public policy, but she says living with this disease has made her more vested in the healthcare conversation. “I am living with what is essentially a pre-existing condition. I’m fortunate enough to have good health insurance, but it makes the potential financial burden of T1D management much more visible and relatable.”


Studies in type 1 patients have shown that in intensively treated patients, diabetic eye disease decreased by 76%, kidney disease decreased by 54%, and nerve disease decreased by 60%. More recently the EDIC trial has shown that type 1 diabetes is also associated with increased heart disease, similar to type 2 diabetes. However, the price for aggressive blood sugar control is a two to three fold increase in the incidence of abnormally low blood sugar levels (caused by the diabetes medications). For this reason, tight control of diabetes to achieve glucose levels between 70 to120 mg/dl is not recommended for children under 13 years of age, patients with severe recurrent hypoglycemia, patients unaware of their hypoglycemia, and patients with far advanced diabetes complications. To achieve optimal glucose control without an undue risk of abnormally lowering blood sugar levels, patients with type 1 diabetes must monitor their blood glucose at least four times a day and administer insulin at least three times per day. In patients with type 2 diabetes, aggressive blood sugar control has similar beneficial effects on the eyes, kidneys, nerves and blood vessels.
Tyler played college basketball at Utah State from 2007-2011, and had the opportunity to play in three NCAA tournaments. His coaches and trainers always had Gatorade or candy on hand in case his blood glucose dropped during a game. Tyler tested his blood glucose right before training, and during halftime breaks. He says working out and playing basketball has helped him to better control his T1D.
There is a risk that those who attempt it and fail could end up worse off, speculates Annie Hoang, a registered dietitian at Sunnybrook. An individual’s metabolism might switch into “starvation mode,” reducing the amount of energy needed at rest, she explains.  That means some patients could regain all the weight they lost – and more – if they stop doing intermittent fasting.
^ Sattar N, Preiss D, Murray HM, Welsh P, Buckley BM, de Craen AJ, Seshasai SR, McMurray JJ, Freeman DJ, Jukema JW, Macfarlane PW, Packard CJ, Stott DJ, Westendorp RG, Shepherd J, Davis BR, Pressel SL, Marchioli R, Marfisi RM, Maggioni AP, Tavazzi L, Tognoni G, Kjekshus J, Pedersen TR, Cook TJ, Gotto AM, Clearfield MB, Downs JR, Nakamura H, Ohashi Y, Mizuno K, Ray KK, Ford I (February 2010). "Statins and risk of incident diabetes: a collaborative meta-analysis of randomised statin trials". Lancet. 375 (9716): 735–42. doi:10.1016/S0140-6736(09)61965-6. PMID 20167359.
The term "type 1 diabetes" has replaced several former terms, including childhood-onset diabetes, juvenile diabetes, and insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM). Likewise, the term "type 2 diabetes" has replaced several former terms, including adult-onset diabetes, obesity-related diabetes, and noninsulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM). Beyond these two types, there is no agreed-upon standard nomenclature.[citation needed]
According to Jack D. Bragg, DO, associate professor of clinical medicine at the University of Missouri, most diabetes-related GI issues stem from a problem with one thing: motion. The digestive tract is a finely tuned muscular machine. It pulls and pushes, expands and contracts, relaxes and squeezes to carry food from your mouth, down the esophagus, into the stomach, and, finally, through 25 feet of nutrient- and water-extracting intestine that ends in, well, your exit.
Diabetes is a whole-body problem. The disease is marked by too high blood glucose, which affects the many cells fed by the circulatory system. The cells of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract and the nerves that control its movement are no exception. People with diabetes have an elevated risk for a spectrum of GI disorders that can make life uncomfortable. Identifying the cause of GI discomfort is the first step toward getting the right treatment and finding relief.
Type 1 and type 2 diabetes were identified as separate conditions for the first time by the Indian physicians Sushruta and Charaka in 400–500 CE with type 1 associated with youth and type 2 with being overweight.[108] The term "mellitus" or "from honey" was added by the Briton John Rolle in the late 1700s to separate the condition from diabetes insipidus, which is also associated with frequent urination.[108] Effective treatment was not developed until the early part of the 20th century, when Canadians Frederick Banting and Charles Herbert Best isolated and purified insulin in 1921 and 1922.[108] This was followed by the development of the long-acting insulin NPH in the 1940s.[108]
To determine your best treatment course, the Diabetes Relief team requires a metabolic test during your consultation. This simple, pain-free, highly accurate breathing test takes only about 10 minutes. From there, the medical team can first determine if the treatment will help. Then they will design an individualized blend of traditional diabetic care coupled with a revolutionary infusion therapy and a supplement protocol as the patient’s care plan to “help you get your life back.” All patient care is overseen by Medical Director Lindsey Jackson, MD, PhD, a multidisciplinary physician with expertise in cell biology, wound healing, and hyperbarics, who has significant scientific publications in books and journals.
There is, in fact, no difference in meaning between preventive and preventative. Some, including William Safire in a 1993 On Language column, have suggested using preventive as an adjective and preventative as a noun, but both forms of the word have alternated freely as adjective and noun since they entered the language in the 17th century. Despite their introduction into English at roughly the same time (the Oxford English Dictionary dates preventive back to 1626 and preventative to 1655), preventive has won out as the preferred version.
Exposure to certain viral infections (mumps and Coxsackie viruses) or other environmental toxins may serve to trigger abnormal antibody responses that cause damage to the pancreas cells where insulin is made. Some of the antibodies seen in type 1 diabetes include anti-islet cell antibodies, anti-insulin antibodies and anti-glutamic decarboxylase antibodies. These antibodies can be detected in the majority of patients, and may help determine which individuals are at risk for developing type 1 diabetes.
David Spero is author of Diabetes: Sugar-coated Crisis, (New Society, 2006) and The Art of Getting Well: Maximizing Health When You Have a Chronic Illness (Hunter House, 2002). He writes for Diabetes Self-Management and Arthritis Self-Management magazines regularly and blogs at www.diabetesselfmanagement.com/blog. See more of David’s work at www.davidsperorn.com.

But carping over wellness faded away in the ’90s as the term gained a foothold in everyday use. The American Heritage Dictionary silently dropped the usage note on wellness in its fourth edition in 2000, a decision that its supervising editor, Steve Kleinedler, chalks up to the growing prevalence of wellness programs in the workplace and beyond. A word that once sounded strange and unnecessary, even to its original boosters, has become tacitly accepted as part of our lexicon of health. Well, well, well.

She says that the problem with diabetes is that it’s a silent disease. “Apart from needing to go to the loo a few times in the middle of the night, I experienced zero symptoms. Diabetes had no impact on my life – 99% of the time I forgot I even had it. Perhaps if it had been a disease with more symptoms, I would have been more motivated to do something about it.”


The first media reports of Darkes' supposed cure, along with a similar description of the "rare" gene that partially explained it, began surfacing in February 2017. At the time, Darkes made it clear that his doctors in Northampton were still reviewing the test results, and that they would report on their findings soon. A story published in March 2017 in the Northampton Chronicle and Echo reported that Darkes' test results "are expected to be published next week."
When there is excess glucose present in the blood, as with type 2 diabetes, the kidneys react by flushing it out of the blood and into the urine. This results in more urine production and the need to urinate more frequently, as well as an increased risk of urinary tract infections (UTIs) in men and women. People with type 2 diabetes are twice as likely to get a UTI as people without the disease, and the risk is higher in women than in men.
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