The term "diabetes" or "to pass through" was first used in 230 BCE by the Greek Apollonius of Memphis.[108] The disease was considered rare during the time of the Roman empire, with Galen commenting he had only seen two cases during his career.[108] This is possibly due to the diet and lifestyle of the ancients, or because the clinical symptoms were observed during the advanced stage of the disease. Galen named the disease "diarrhea of the urine" (diarrhea urinosa).[110]

English word formation isn't always that tidy, however. The -ative ending often shows up even when there isn't a corresponding noun ending in -ation: we have authoritative without authoritation, qualitative without qualitation and talkative without talkation. Talk, of course, isn't even from Latin, but the friendly -ative suffix clung to it anyway, by analogy with other verbs that form adjectives by appending -ative, like affirm and affirmative, or represent and representative. Preventative got created from prevent by this same analogical pattern.
Instead of referring patients to outside specialists, internists and general practitioners can continue to helm their patients’ diabetic care through Diabetes Relief with referrals to a nearby center. The patient’s doctor and the team at Diabetes Relief work together to get the patient on the road to recovery—not just to a plateau of keeping symptoms in check. Or, doctors can expand their scope of practice and own an in-house, turnkey Diabetes Healthcare Center. This helps their patients avoid the suffering and expense of dialysis or amputations through the proven therapies of Diabetes Relief.

Alcohol: Alcohol can dangerously increase blood sugar and lead to liver toxicity. Research published in Annals of Internal Medicine found that there was a 43 percent increased incidence of diabetes associated with heavy consumption of alcohol, which is defined as three or more drinks per day. (8) Beer and sweet liquors are especially high in carbohydrates and should be avoided.


There is, in fact, no difference in meaning between preventive and preventative. Some, including William Safire in a 1993 On Language column, have suggested using preventive as an adjective and preventative as a noun, but both forms of the word have alternated freely as adjective and noun since they entered the language in the 17th century. Despite their introduction into English at roughly the same time (the Oxford English Dictionary dates preventive back to 1626 and preventative to 1655), preventive has won out as the preferred version.

Melissa Conrad Stöppler, MD, is a U.S. board-certified Anatomic Pathologist with subspecialty training in the fields of Experimental and Molecular Pathology. Dr. Stöppler's educational background includes a BA with Highest Distinction from the University of Virginia and an MD from the University of North Carolina. She completed residency training in Anatomic Pathology at Georgetown University followed by subspecialty fellowship training in molecular diagnostics and experimental pathology.
If the amount of insulin available is insufficient, or if cells respond poorly to the effects of insulin (insulin insensitivity or insulin resistance), or if the insulin itself is defective, then glucose will not be absorbed properly by the body cells that require it, and it will not be stored appropriately in the liver and muscles. The net effect is persistently high levels of blood glucose, poor protein synthesis, and other metabolic derangements, such as acidosis.[60]
Diabetes mellitus is a group of metabolic diseases characterized by high blood sugar (glucose) levels that result from defects in insulin secretion, or its action, or both. Diabetes mellitus, commonly referred to as diabetes (as it will be in this article) was first identified as a disease associated with "sweet urine," and excessive muscle loss in the ancient world. Elevated levels of blood glucose (hyperglycemia) lead to spillage of glucose into the urine, hence the term sweet urine.

We’re growing in ranks. We’re tired of seeing our families suffer from unnecessary illness and tired of having to fight so hard just to eat real food. You’ll know us by the coconut oil on our counters and the chia seeds in our pantries. By the bentonite clay in our bathrooms and the charcoal on our teeth. We often sleep on organic mattresses and have salt lamps in our bedrooms. We can use spirulina with the best of them, cook 5 kinds of bone broth and use castor oil for longer lashes. We might even make homemade deodorant and use essential oil diffusers 24/7.
Diabetes mellitus is classified into four broad categories: type 1, type 2, gestational diabetes, and "other specific types".[11] The "other specific types" are a collection of a few dozen individual causes.[11] Diabetes is a more variable disease than once thought and people may have combinations of forms.[37] The term "diabetes", without qualification, usually refers to diabetes mellitus.
Medications include a long (and boring) list of chemical names such as metformin, sulfonylureas, meglitinides, thiazolidinediones … you get the point. Each of these drugs works by either helping the body secrete more insulin, making tissues more sensitive to the hormone, or preventing the secretion of more sugar into the bloodstream. But, ultimately, the first line of defense against diabetes is direct insulin injection because of its high efficacy. And there are at least six main types of insulin, accompanied by another long list of difficult-to-pronounce suffixes, each with a slightly different effect. Along with treatment, diabetes requires constant monitoring for blood sugar levels, which include at-home blood tests, and routine medical check-ups. An insulin pump that monitors and injects insulin when needed is another option.
Sex is a good pain reliever, and orgasm is more powerful than almost any drug in relieving pain. Rutgers University professor and sex researcher Beverly Whipple, PhD, found that when women had orgasms, their pain “thresholds” went up by more than 108%. In other words, things that usually hurt them no longer had an effect. She believes men have similar responses, though she’s only studied women. The pain-reducing effect seems to last for hours.
A 2017 article in the journal Diabetes Care explains that the goals for dietary change should be “healthful eating patterns emphasizing a variety of nutrient-dense foods in appropriate portion sizes.” Additional goals include achieving a healthy weight; attaining healthy blood sugar, blood pressure, and lipid levels; and reducing complications. The authors emphasize developing an individualized plan based on “personal and cultural preferences, health literacy and numeracy, access to healthful foods, willingness and ability to make behavioral changes, and barriers to change.”
The term "diabetes" or "to pass through" was first used in 230 BCE by the Greek Apollonius of Memphis.[108] The disease was considered rare during the time of the Roman empire, with Galen commenting he had only seen two cases during his career.[108] This is possibly due to the diet and lifestyle of the ancients, or because the clinical symptoms were observed during the advanced stage of the disease. Galen named the disease "diarrhea of the urine" (diarrhea urinosa).[110]
Trick (important): Cut down on sweets, and if you can, cut them out entirely for a couple months. I still eat ice cream about once a week, and know people who are losing weight on this diet while eating ice cream almost every day. But this probably won’t be the case for everyone. Better to severely restrict sweets for the first few months, and then gradually reintroduce.
Benari, an Ashkenazi Jew, doesn’t fall into that category. But Cummings and other bariatric experts I spoke to said that surgery should be a possible option for any person whose diabetes isn’t improving. Cummings himself is currently working on a clinical trial in India of bariatric patients with BMIs as low as 25. And he expects similar trials will come down the pipeline.
She says that the problem with diabetes is that it’s a silent disease. “Apart from needing to go to the loo a few times in the middle of the night, I experienced zero symptoms. Diabetes had no impact on my life – 99% of the time I forgot I even had it. Perhaps if it had been a disease with more symptoms, I would have been more motivated to do something about it.”
In this diabetes-related complication, an uncooperative stomach is slow to move food into the intestine, and does so unpredictably. The symptoms of gastroparesis include upper abdominal pain, nausea, vomiting, bloating, lack of appetite, and reflux, the flowing backward of stomach contents into the esophagus. Wild, unexplained swings in blood glucose are another clue that you may have gastroparesis. For example, blood glucose may go low if food isn’t absorbed until after mealtime insulin takes effect; later, blood glucose levels may spike, when the stomach finally ushers food into the intestine and there’s not enough remaining insulin on board.

^ Cheng J, Zhang W, Zhang X, Han F, Li X, He X, Li Q, Chen J (May 2014). "Effect of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and angiotensin II receptor blockers on all-cause mortality, cardiovascular deaths, and cardiovascular events in patients with diabetes mellitus: a meta-analysis". JAMA Internal Medicine. 174 (5): 773–85. doi:10.1001/jamainternmed.2014.348. PMID 24687000.

Type 1 diabetes occurs because the insulin-producing cells of the pancreas (beta cells) are damaged. In type 1 diabetes, the pancreas makes little or no insulin, so sugar cannot get into the body's cells for use as energy. People with type 1 diabetes must use insulin injections to control their blood glucose. Type 1 is the most common form of diabetes in people who are under age 30, but it can occur at any age. Ten percent of people with diabetes are diagnosed with type 1.

Anti-seizure drugs. Some medications used to treat seizure disorders (epilepsy) are also used to ease nerve pain. The American Diabetes Association recommends starting with pregabalin (Lyrica). Others that have been used to treat neuropathy are gabapentin (Gralise, Neurontin) and carbamazepine (Carbatrol, Tegretol). Side effects may include drowsiness, dizziness and swelling.
Instead of referring patients to outside specialists, internists and general practitioners can continue to helm their patients’ diabetic care through Diabetes Relief with referrals to a nearby center. The patient’s doctor and the team at Diabetes Relief work together to get the patient on the road to recovery—not just to a plateau of keeping symptoms in check. Or, doctors can expand their scope of practice and own an in-house, turnkey Diabetes Healthcare Center. This helps their patients avoid the suffering and expense of dialysis or amputations through the proven therapies of Diabetes Relief.

This seems hard to do, but really it’s not if you know one secret: Replace snacking with something far more satisfying — fat. That’s right, the government is wrong to recommend a low fat diet. Fat is what makes you feel full until your next meal. Take away the fat, take away the full. Don’t go to an extreme, but do lean strongly toward a high-fat low-carb diet.


There is no known preventive measure for type 1 diabetes.[2] Type 2 diabetes – which accounts for 85–90% of all cases – can often be prevented or delayed by maintaining a normal body weight, engaging in physical activity, and consuming a healthy diet.[2] Higher levels of physical activity (more than 90 minutes per day) reduce the risk of diabetes by 28%.[71] Dietary changes known to be effective in helping to prevent diabetes include maintaining a diet rich in whole grains and fiber, and choosing good fats, such as the polyunsaturated fats found in nuts, vegetable oils, and fish.[72] Limiting sugary beverages and eating less red meat and other sources of saturated fat can also help prevent diabetes.[72] Tobacco smoking is also associated with an increased risk of diabetes and its complications, so smoking cessation can be an important preventive measure as well.[73]

'On the basis of our study, we conclude the following: (1) remission of DM [Diabetes mellitus] is possible following stem cell therapy; (2) stem cell transplantation can be a safe and effective approach for therapy of DM; (3) available data from these clinical trials indicate that the most promising therapeutic outcome was shown in mobilized marrow CD34+ HSCs; [hematopoietic stem cells] (4) patients with previously diagnosed diabetic ketoacidosis are not good candidates for the applied approaches stem cell therapy; (5) stem cell therapy at early stages after DM diagnosis is more effective than intervention at later stages; and (6) well-designed large scale randomized studies considering the stem cell type, cell number, and infusion method in DM patients are urgently needed.'
The old “bring people to the table” metaphor rang especially egregious to the artist and writer Anasa Troutman, who had a similarly revelatory vision for wellness: “Unless we’re willing to make a commitment to community, we will never be well. Even if you wake up every morning and drink your juice and do your yoga, without that commitment to each other we will not be well as a country and as a world,” Troutman said.
Founded in 2007, San Francisco startup NGM Biopharmaceuticals is a pharmaceutical company that has raised $295.4 million, with pharmaceutical giant Merck & Co., as one of its most recent investors. The company has just filed to sell $75 million of its common stock in an IPO. The company’s primary candidate for treating diabetes is NGM313, an engineered antibody that binds to a novel pathway that reduces insulin resistance. After the successful conclusion of a phase I on the drug, NGM plans to license the antibody to Merck.
The word mellitus (/məˈlaɪtəs/ or /ˈmɛlɪtəs/) comes from the classical Latin word mellītus, meaning "mellite"[114] (i.e. sweetened with honey;[114] honey-sweet[115]). The Latin word comes from mell-, which comes from mel, meaning "honey";[114][115] sweetness;[115] pleasant thing,[115] and the suffix -ītus,[114] whose meaning is the same as that of the English suffix "-ite".[116] It was Thomas Willis who in 1675 added "mellitus" to the word "diabetes" as a designation for the disease, when he noticed the urine of a diabetic had a sweet taste (glycosuria). This sweet taste had been noticed in urine by the ancient Greeks, Chinese, Egyptians, Indians, and Persians.
Keep your blood pressure under control. People with diabetes are more likely to have high blood pressure than are people who don't have diabetes. Having both high blood pressure and diabetes greatly increases your risk of complications because both damage your blood vessels and reduce blood flow. Try to keep your blood pressure in the range your doctor recommends, and be sure to have it checked at every office visit.

Certain drugs that affect the brain can help to control chronic pain. Antidepressants in the class of drugs known as selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), which include duloxetine (Cymbalta), are often prescribed for pain. So are tricyclic antidepressants (TCAs) such as amitriptyline (Elavil). SSRIs often boost energy, while TCAs can make you sleepy. According to the Harvard Medical School website, “Some physicians prescribe an SSRI during the day and amitriptyline at bedtime for pain patients.”


Diabetes has grown to “epidemic” proportions, and the latest statistics revealed by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention state that 30.3 million Americans have diabetes, including the 7.2 million people who weren’t even aware of it. Diabetes is affecting people of all ages, including 132,000 children and adolescents younger than 18 years old. (2)

^ O'Gara PT, Kushner FG, Ascheim DD, Casey DE, Chung MK, de Lemos JA, Ettinger SM, Fang JC, Fesmire FM, Franklin BA, Granger CB, Krumholz HM, Linderbaum JA, Morrow DA, Newby LK, Ornato JP, Ou N, Radford MJ, Tamis-Holland JE, Tommaso CL, Tracy CM, Woo YJ, Zhao DX, Anderson JL, Jacobs AK, Halperin JL, Albert NM, Brindis RG, Creager MA, DeMets D, Guyton RA, Hochman JS, Kovacs RJ, Kushner FG, Ohman EM, Stevenson WG, Yancy CW (January 2013). "2013 ACCF/AHA guideline for the management of ST-elevation myocardial infarction: a report of the American College of Cardiology Foundation/American Heart Association Task Force on Practice Guidelines". Circulation. 127 (4): e362–425. doi:10.1161/CIR.0b013e3182742cf6. PMID 23247304.
Nerves help orchestrate this digestive tour de force, says Bragg, by telling the muscles what to do. Uncontrolled diabetes, though, can damage the nerves, leading to some GI missteps. “It has to do with hyperglycemia [high blood glucose],” says Bragg. “We don’t know the exact mechanism.” We do know that blood glucose control can both prevent and improve GI dysfunction.
When the glucose concentration in the blood remains high over time, the kidneys will reach a threshold of reabsorption, and glucose will be excreted in the urine (glycosuria).[62] This increases the osmotic pressure of the urine and inhibits reabsorption of water by the kidney, resulting in increased urine production (polyuria) and increased fluid loss. Lost blood volume will be replaced osmotically from water held in body cells and other body compartments, causing dehydration and increased thirst (polydipsia).[60]
Exposure to certain viral infections (mumps and Coxsackie viruses) or other environmental toxins may serve to trigger abnormal antibody responses that cause damage to the pancreas cells where insulin is made. Some of the antibodies seen in type 1 diabetes include anti-islet cell antibodies, anti-insulin antibodies and anti-glutamic decarboxylase antibodies. These antibodies can be detected in the majority of patients, and may help determine which individuals are at risk for developing type 1 diabetes.
The word podcast has by now become completely untethered from its namesake—the iPod. Analytics that were once uncapturable have become fairly comprehensive (downloads from Apple Podcasts surpassed 50 billion this year) and specific (Chicago streams more podcasts on Spotify than any other U.S. city does), which has brought new money and possibility to the form. Recipes for how to create a decent series were invented through trial and error, and thousands of producers now understand what makes our ears stand up: cults, cold cases, politics, feminism, and relationships, but most of all: stories.
Nerves in the legs and feet are often most affected by neuropathy. This can cause you to lose sensation to your feet and legs. Sores and cuts can go unnoticed and lead to infections. In some extreme cases, infections can become severe and lead to ulcers. Over time, this can cause irreparable damage to the soft tissue and lead to the loss of toes or even your foot.

Vanadium is a compound found in tiny amounts in plants and animals. Early studies showed that vanadium normalized blood sugar levels in animals with type 1 and type 2 diabetes. When people with diabetes were given vanadium, they had a modest increase in insulin sensitivity and were able to lower their need for insulin. Researchers want to understand how vanadium works in the body, find potential side effects, and set safe dosages.


Check out the NWI Podcast to hear from wellness experts in all Six Dimensions of Wellness. Hear from wellness coaches, worksite wellness experts, psychologists, medical doctors, spiritual teachers, and more with evidence-based information and practical tips on how to improve your holistic wellness today. Go to NWIpodcast.org  to listen and download show notes and bonus materials (NWI members get access to exclusive bonus materials). You can also listen on Soundcloud or subscribe on iTunes.
First, the health of your gut is critical to your overall health. This is because your gut is home of trillions of microbes called the gut microbiome. These microbes work in symbiotic and antagonistic relationships within your body. A 2017 study using multiple therapies to manipulate the gut microbiome composition, found they could impact the individual’s health more rapidly. This study also found manipulating the gut microbiome as an effective way to avoid insulin resistance and therefore prevent diabetes.

These days, American children on average receive about $800 per year in allowance, according to the American Institute of Certified Public Accountants. Kids, though, are usually not receiving money for nothing—the vast majority of American parents who pay allowance (who themselves are a majority of American parents) tie it to the completion of work around the house.
Currently, no fully artificial pancreas system has been approved by the FDA for use in the U.S. The most advanced product on the market in the USA is currently Medtronic’s MiniMed system which can automatically suspend insulin delivery when it detects low blood sugars. The next generation of their system will anticipate low blood sugars and stop insulin delivery in advance.
The Wellness Center promotes positive health behaviors and encourages social connections that support student success. We use health promotion theory and campaigns, programming, individual assessments and consultation, along with peer-to-peer outreach to improve the health of individual students and our campus. We provide support and education for life outside the classroom so you can maximize your time at CWU and build skills for the future.
Hypoglycemia means abnormally low blood sugar (glucose). In patients with diabetes, the most common cause of low blood sugar is excessive use of insulin or other glucose-lowering medications, to lower the blood sugar level in diabetic patients in the presence of a delayed or absent meal. When low blood sugar levels occur because of too much insulin, it is called an insulin reaction. Sometimes, low blood sugar can be the result of an insufficient caloric intake or sudden excessive physical exertion.
We’re growing in ranks. We’re tired of seeing our families suffer from unnecessary illness and tired of having to fight so hard just to eat real food. You’ll know us by the coconut oil on our counters and the chia seeds in our pantries. By the bentonite clay in our bathrooms and the charcoal on our teeth. We often sleep on organic mattresses and have salt lamps in our bedrooms. We can use spirulina with the best of them, cook 5 kinds of bone broth and use castor oil for longer lashes. We might even make homemade deodorant and use essential oil diffusers 24/7.

Antidepressants most commonly treat depression. However, they can be prescribed for diabetic nerve pain because they interfere with chemicals in your brain that cause you to feel pain. Your doctor may recommend tricyclic antidepressants, such as amitriptyline, imipramine (Tofranil), and desipramine (Norpramin). These can cause unpleasant side effects like dry mouth, fatigue, and sweating.
The National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK) and many other physician groups recommend eating a variety of foods from all food groups: non-starchy vegetables, starchy vegetables, fruits, whole grains, lean protein, healthy fats, and dairy. They recommend portion control and calorie counting, and also limiting the following:
These surgeries, even today, come with significant side effects. People have to be vigilant about getting their needed nutrients, since many aren’t as easily absorbed through food anymore. Other substances are too easily absorbed by the body, particularly drugs like alcohol. This vulnerability can then lead to alcohol abuse and may even help explain the slightly higher rates of suicide and self-harm seen in patients soon after surgery. Also distressing is that an estimated one of every 10 patients will fail to lose weight or regain the weight back in the long term, while others will require additional operations to fix complications like stomach leakages.
A women gets her blood glucose levels checked at a pop-up clinic in Mexico City’s neighborhood of La Roma by Dr. Eduardo Juarez Oliveros. The clinic was set up by the Association Mexica de Diabetes (AMD) in partnership with Direct Relief. The clinic is aimed at serving populations in the city displaced by the earthquake, especially those with diabetes. (Photo by Meghan Dhaliwal for Direct Relief)
What medication is available for diabetes? Diabetes causes blood sugar levels to rise. The body may stop producing insulin, the hormone that regulates blood sugar, and this results in type 1 diabetes. In people with type 2 diabetes, insulin is not working effectively. Learn about the range of treatments for each type and recent medical developments here. Read now
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