For 15 years, Erez Benari’s struggle with his type 2 diabetes had been a losing one. A software engineer at Microsoft in Seattle, Washington, Benari had stuck to a restrictive diet that kept him off most carbs, along with regular insulin shots. But still, his high blood sugar levels never dropped, while his health continued to decline. In 2013, the then 39-year-old Benari suffered a heart attack.


For now, I manage my diabetes through a combination of technologies. I use a blood test meter to measure my glucose levels at least five times a day. I use a pump that is attached to my abdomen to deliver frequent doses of insulin throughout the day. And now I also use a continuous monitoring device that measures my subcutaneous blood sugar levels to help the insulin pump work more effectively.
“The cell is the original smart machine,” notes Crystal Nyitray, PhD, on the website of Encellin, the biotech start-up she founded in 2016. “All drugs, devices, and even digital health approaches are trying to restore or copy these functions. At Encellin, we believe in the human cell and creating a safe and reliable solution for patients. We are creating a technology to promote cell function and protection.” 
Vanadium is a compound found in tiny amounts in plants and animals. Early studies showed that vanadium normalized blood sugar levels in animals with type 1 and type 2 diabetes. When people with diabetes were given vanadium, they had a modest increase in insulin sensitivity and were able to lower their need for insulin. Researchers want to understand how vanadium works in the body, find potential side effects, and set safe dosages.
Kidney damage from diabetes is called diabetic nephropathy. The onset of kidney disease and its progression is extremely variable. Initially, diseased small blood vessels in the kidneys cause the leakage of protein in the urine. Later on, the kidneys lose their ability to cleanse and filter blood. The accumulation of toxic waste products in the blood leads to the need for dialysis. Dialysis involves using a machine that serves the function of the kidney by filtering and cleaning the blood. In patients who do not want to undergo chronic dialysis, kidney transplantation can be considered.

Founded in 2007, San Francisco startup NGM Biopharmaceuticals is a pharmaceutical company that has raised $295.4 million, with pharmaceutical giant Merck & Co., as one of its most recent investors. The company has just filed to sell $75 million of its common stock in an IPO. The company’s primary candidate for treating diabetes is NGM313, an engineered antibody that binds to a novel pathway that reduces insulin resistance. After the successful conclusion of a phase I on the drug, NGM plans to license the antibody to Merck.
But does Darkes' story really mean type 1 diabetes can be cured? Darkes declined to provide his medical records, and the experts Live Science spoke to said there were several missing or confusing pieces of information in his story. Usually, incredible medical stories like this one are reported as case reports in the medical literature, the experts said. And even if the details of his story can ultimately be confirmed, the experts emphasized that it's extremely unlikely that Darkes' case would lead to a widespread cure for type 1 diabetes, as reports in the media have wrongly suggested.
When pain is a source of fear, anger, or grief, it usually hurts more. Cancer patients may experience worse pain, because they fear it means their disease is worsening or that they may be dying. Because your thoughts about your pain have a major effect on how bad it feels, it can help to change your thoughts. For example, you might try changing a negative thought such as, “This pain keeps me from doing everything I like,” to a more realistic, positive one such as, “This pain makes it harder to do things, but I can sometimes find different ways to do them.” Doing this can actually turn down your pain level.

Diabetes Relief provides the gold standard for diabetes care by employing its patent-pending protocol using FDA-approved drugs and devices that are covered and recognized by most insurance providers. Upon receipt of approval from Diabetes Relief, physicians can apply for affiliation to become a licensed Diabetes Healthcare Center. Assistance with all aspects of build-out of the care facility and hiring and training staff is provided to approved practices.


Though it may be transient, untreated GDM can damage the health of the fetus or mother. Risks to the baby include macrosomia (high birth weight), congenital heart and central nervous system abnormalities, and skeletal muscle malformations. Increased levels of insulin in a fetus's blood may inhibit fetal surfactant production and cause infant respiratory distress syndrome. A high blood bilirubin level may result from red blood cell destruction. In severe cases, perinatal death may occur, most commonly as a result of poor placental perfusion due to vascular impairment. Labor induction may be indicated with decreased placental function. A caesarean section may be performed if there is marked fetal distress or an increased risk of injury associated with macrosomia, such as shoulder dystocia.[51]
A substantial proportion of people who experience type 2 diabetes remission after gastric bypass eventually have relapse of the disease down the road. I feel the best study of this was done by my co-author on CROSSROADS, David Arterburn. In a study of nearly 5,000 patients with diabetes who underwent [gastric bypass surgery] and were followed retrospectively for 13 years, about 70% experienced diabetes remission. Among these, about 1/3 eventually relapsed, but it’s important to note that the median disease-free interval was 8.3 years.

Cataracts and glaucoma are also more common among diabetics. It is also important to note that since the lens of the eye lets water through, if blood sugar concentrations vary a lot, the lens of the eye will shrink and swell with fluid accordingly. As a result, blurry vision is very common in poorly controlled diabetes. Patients are usually discouraged from getting a new eyeglass prescription until their blood sugar is controlled. This allows for a more accurate assessment of what kind of glasses prescription is required.
I went to one interactive session on masculinity, and I was asked to do eye gazing for several minutes with another man while answering prompts like “Something I’m afraid to tell you is” and “Something I love about myself is.” It is meant to teach men to be expressive, and to see that it can feel normal and good. The only strange thing for me was the uninterrupted eye contact at abnormally close range, about a foot. The women in the session watched us do the exercise and shared their reactions afterward, and many seemed genuinely moved because they hadn’t seen men talk to each other like this before.

Dr. Richard A. Anderson, at the Human Nutrition Research Center (USDA), found that people who eat apple pie have a significantly lower probability of getting Type II diabetes. Upon further examination, he isolated cinnamon as the substance in the apple pies that was preventing diabetes. Within cinnamon, the key substance is a water soluble polyphenol type-A polymer as the effective ingredient. Here is a link to the article:
This content is provided as a service of the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK), part of the National Institutes of Health. The NIDDK translates and disseminates research findings through its clearinghouses and education programs to increase knowledge and understanding about health and disease among patients, health professionals, and the public. Content produced by the NIDDK is carefully reviewed by NIDDK scientists and other experts.
×